Interrupt

Composed entirely of digital code, and structured around the relationship between algorithm, database and discrete aural, visual and textual elements, Interrupt, 2004 both conforms to and critiques the ontology of the computer.  The work explores ways in which the rational and binary-ordered ontology of the computer can be disrupted through attention to non-binary and feminine modes of thinking. 

On the level of material organisation the discrete digital elements comprise a database; the algorithms provide rules that determine how the text, images and sound interact with each other, and how the elements will respond to user interaction.  

Slight transformational shifts occur at the borders between text, image, sound and algorithm.  The potential for organic movement, rhythms and tempos to destabilise the scientific production of art emerges fleetingly before being interrupted.

On launching the work a web page appears covered with fairly thin gray columns made from vertical repetitions of the word Process.  On the top left of the page is the title of the work. Rolling the cursor over the word triggers an action that opens a new browser window.  In the new browser window algorithms attached to individual textual and visual elements organise the content relationally: a reworked digital image of Boticelli’s Venus combines with a static text on creativity in black ink. Towards the centre right of the screen two scroll bars vertically dissect the page. To the Ancient Greeks, Venus (as Aphrodite) symbolised ‘birth and regeneration.  A seasonal goddess, Aphrodite is always in the process of becoming, and thus symbolic of feminine transformation itself. In this work, image and text intermingle as they seep across each other’s borders.